1. text
    The Leatherdos.
Designed originally as a kippah clip to hold your yarmulke in place, the Leatherdos (portmanteau of Leatherman and dos, meaning religious) was designed by Yaacov Goldberg as the natural progression of all the things men have done with their kippah clip over the years.
It’s now being sold as a hair clip as well as a kippah clip, and it has on it:
Shopping trolley coin
Screwdriver for Phillips heads
Small screwdriver
Large screwdriver
Cutting edge
Ruler
8mm wrench
It’s currently at Animi Causa for $9.99.
(Seen at Gizmodo.)

    The Leatherdos.

    Designed originally as a kippah clip to hold your yarmulke in place, the Leatherdos (portmanteau of Leatherman and dos, meaning religious) was designed by Yaacov Goldberg as the natural progression of all the things men have done with their kippah clip over the years.

    It’s now being sold as a hair clip as well as a kippah clip, and it has on it:

    • Shopping trolley coin
    • Screwdriver for Phillips heads
    • Small screwdriver
    • Large screwdriver
    • Cutting edge
    • Ruler
    • 8mm wrench

    It’s currently at Animi Causa for $9.99.

    (Seen at Gizmodo.)

  2. becausesometimesdreamsdocometrue:

    Disney has at last devised a way to get back the meager bit that I don’t already give to them of my paycheck. Behold the glory of all the new Haunted Mansion merchandise that will soon be mine.

    GIVE IT ALL TO ME.

    Oh man. The apron. The t-shirts. The charm bracelets. THE PLATES.

    (via thehauntedmansiondisney)

  3. text
  4. archiemcphee:

    Today we step into the Archie McPhee Library to explore a macabre and fascinating book entitled The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death [Buy on Amazon] by Corinne May Botz, whose outstanding photos reveal one of the strangest and most significant tools in the development of modern forensic analysis: eighteen miniature, exhaustively detailed crime scene models built in the 1940s and 50s by pioneering criminologist Frances Glessner Lee (1878-1962). She called her models “Nutshell Studies” because, “the purpose of a forensic investigation is said to be to ‘convict the guilty, clear the innocent, and find the truth in a nutshell.’”

    Glessner Lee was a grandmother in her 60s when she painstakingly created these dollhouse models, each of which is based on an actual homicide, suicide or accidental death. To help ensure accuracy she attended autopsies and made sure that even the smallest details of her models were correct. Clothing is appropriately worn out, pencils write, locks, windows, and lights all function, whistles blow, and mice inhabit the walls. These astonishing models were (and still are!) used to train detectives on how to asses visual evidence.

    Corinne May Botz’s lush color photographs lure viewers into every crevice of Frances Lee’s models and breathe life into these deadly miniatures, which present the dark side of domestic life, unveiling tales of prostitution, alcoholism, and adultery. The accompanying line drawings, specially prepared for this volume, highlight the noteworthy forensic evidence in each case. Botz’s introductory essay, which draws on archival research and interviews with Lee’s family and police colleagues, presents a captivating portrait of Lee.

    Frances Glessner Lee was also an heiress who used her considerable fortune to found Harvard’s department of legal medicine, the first forensic pathology program in the nation. In 1943 she was appointed an honorary Captain in the New Hampshire State Police. She was the first woman in the United States to hold that rank.

    It’s a dark topic, to be sure, but this beautiful book is an intimate and utterly captivating look at the work of a truly remarkable woman and one of the most important figures in the development of modern forensic analysis.

    [Images via the New York Times and The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death]

  5. text
    70sscifiart:

Almost there

    70sscifiart:

    Almost there

  6. text
    Take one Star Wars Ship Cake Silicone Mould.
Take one Maple Bundt Cake recipe.
Eat the Death Star. EAT IT.

    Take one Star Wars Ship Cake Silicone Mould.

    Take one Maple Bundt Cake recipe.

    Eat the Death Star. EAT IT.

  7. text
    weirdvintage:

Becoming a “witch!” can improve relationships, get you a job, and more!—1973 (via Vintage-Ads LJ)

    weirdvintage:

    Becoming a “witch!” can improve relationships, get you a job, and more!—1973 (via Vintage-Ads LJ)

  8. text
    Another project I just finished, although this one is much less complicated and more ridiculous.
It’s a Charlie Brown themed hat for a friend. It has stupid colour stranding. But it is nice and warm.  Which would be great, except that it’s the summer now, so it’s not like you’re going to wear it.
Also, the background is the cover of Meco’s 15-minute Star Wars disco remix. Because I CAN.

    Another project I just finished, although this one is much less complicated and more ridiculous.

    It’s a Charlie Brown themed hat for a friend. It has stupid colour stranding. But it is nice and warm.  Which would be great, except that it’s the summer now, so it’s not like you’re going to wear it.

    Also, the background is the cover of Meco’s 15-minute Star Wars disco remix. Because I CAN.

  9. So this epic beast is my completed Seaside Shawl, designed by Cath Ward.

    I knitted it using Regia Lace in Aventurine, which I bought at Knit Nottingham. I bought it without thinking about a pattern, but then when I saw this lovely fish-scale and wave shawl, I knew I had the perfect yarn for it.

    It’s immense, it’s overly complicated looking, and it’s really way way way too femme-y for my usual daily wear, but I love having it and I love having made it.

  10. text
    cryptofwrestling:

Studious Vampira. (c.1958)

    cryptofwrestling:

    Studious Vampira. (c.1958)

→

About

Space monkey from the wilds of the Angeleno aerospace suburbs rocketed to the damp hideout of medieval hoodlums.

My cities have been a collection of Ns. North Long Beach, New Orleans, Nottingham.

Discovered my future when a friend sat me down at a VAX terminal and telnetted into a MUD. Now spend my days building and breaking websites for fun and profit. Not to mention co-opting intellectual property as my dollhouse.

Owns a goldfish named after a TV host and a growing collection of yarn. Build shrines and tableaux wherever I go, because they can’t stay in their original packaging.

Howdy.

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